Projects

TIMEBOMB

Team Timebomb – CALM BOX

About CALM BOX:

Behind CALM BOX stands the provocative question “What can possibly be good about living with dementia?” as it touches upon two issues:

  • Media images about living with dementia emphasise the negative sides of the illness, leading to stigmatisation and fear
  • People living with dementia are often considered passive, as recipients of e.g. care or designed objects

CALM BOX questions the negative image of dementia by focusing on what people living with dementia can give to others. Conceptualizing dementia as a set of symptoms that disrupt time, it highlights our society’s obsessions with timetabling and scheduling. In a less time-obsessed society would dementia be less disabling? Living in the ‘Now’ and focussing on the task ahead are symptoms of dementia, that are searched for by others, who are interested in mindful living.

The CALM BOX concept brings together people who can benefit from watching calming and repetitive tasks, such as people with anxiety disorders and people living with dementia – in real life or through a video-phone connection.

Working together with charities in the area of mental health and dementia to:

  • Promote the concept
  • Distribute the soft- and hardware needed
  • Educate people taking part
  • Supervise interactions where needed

CALM BOX aims to give people living with dementia an active role.

The working prototype of CALM BOX consists of a box in which to keep activity sets, the person with dementia might like to do, such as knitting or puzzles. When the box is opened, it is possible through physical motion to access a screen and open a video-connection with someone living with an anxiety disorder. The control whether the activity should be undertaken alone or with someone else present lies with the person with dementia, who controls what is done and for how long.

calmbox

 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

The team’s pitch presentation slides

Contact the team!

Email Britta

CAN

Codes and Nodes – Voice4Dementia

About Voice4Dementia:

Voice4Dementia is an online community to bring together people living with dementia, their carers and their friends and family. It is a platform for all these groups of people to upload and share their experiences via video. There is scope for ‘day in the life’ pieces, which can potentially provide a deep insight into people’s lives and perhaps remove some of the stigma surrounding dementia. Sharing stories and experiences in this way allow these groups to not feel as isolated and misunderstood, and gives them an avenue to get their thoughts across to others. Further, it can be very hard for researchers to access people with dementia, with this platform the researchers can access the experiences of people with dementia and in this way, the people with dementia can guide development.
 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

Contact the team!

If you wish to contact the team please email the admin

The_confabulators

The Confabulators – SwayTheBand

About SwayTheBand

SwaytheBand was designed for a group of people with dementia living in care in a rural town in the south of Ireland. Although many of these people experience tension and distress while living in care, music sessions in the care unit bring members together several times a week. This is a time full of emotion for the residents who have a shared love of music. This is an opportunity for some light exercise, creative moment, and to enjoy each other’s company.

SwaytheBand is designed to give the adults in these music sessions a helping hand in these performances. The digital prototype helps them sway to the music by illustrating the tempo of the songs they enjoy in the group. It also provides a clear invitation to participate in the fun, functioning as a simple musical instrument that can be used to join in and express themselves.

The initial digital prototype was set up for one piece of traditional music called ‘Shrimp Boats’, performed by Jo Stafford. At the start of the performance the controllers displayed pink (the colour of shrimp) before we used different colour lights to illustrate the temp of the song. We chose to change between green, white and gold to reflect the colours of the Irish flag as something the residents would find familiar.

The controllers were made by appropriating PlayStation Move controllers which we presented as batons. This design aesthetic was important as it helped tie the controllers to the context of the care home and activity. To create this aesthetic, we covered the handle of our controllers in the style of old rope as we drew inspiration from the maritime theme and the trawling nets on the ‘shrimp boats’ described in the song. This design made our controllers easy to hold, pleasing to look at and soft in case they were dropped.

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

The team’s presentation slides

Contact the team!

Email Kellie

The_crooked_Star

Crooked Star – Discombobulator

About Discombobulator

The discombobulator is a web based application the aims to recreate some of the hardships that people with dementia experience. It is for people who are interested in gaining understanding and insights into people with dementia’s lives. By the person using the app playing the role of someone with dementia, this should be effective in creating empathy. The app currently has three scenarios that the user can engage with.
When the users signs up for the app, 48 hours later they will begin to receive text messages as if sent from a care giver. Then they can begin the 3 tasks.
The first task is based on journey. The user is asked to follow some directions to locate a particular place, which they do not know at this point. The instructions gradually become more abstract and this invokes some confusion and disorientation in the user. The instructions take them to a shop where they can begin the next activity.
The next task is the shopping task. The user is sent a shopping list, but it disappears in 5 seconds. They then need to try to buy all the items. The aim of this task is to simulate short term memory. Several minutes later they are prompted to get all the ingredients and take a photo. These items are what they need in the third and final task.
In the third task the user is shown a simple recipe for a cake using the ingredients bought previously at the shop. The recipe changes and adds words though, causing difficulty in comprehension.
At each stage the users are encouraged to reflect and share their experiences by vlogging and taking photos.
Why discombobulator? – It simulates day to day activities experienced by people living with dementia.
 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

Contact the team!

If you wish to contact the team please email the admin

M3

My Memory Matters – Walk Down Memory Lane

About Walk Down Memory Lane

Flipping the idea of what we can do for people with dementia, what can people with dementia do for the rest of society? Walk Down Memory Lane allows people with dementia to contribute to local area knowledge giving them an increased sense of empowerment and citizenship. People with dementia are a resource for the local area. Walk Down Memory Lane also acts as a memory diary, which they can revisit and share with the community, it opens a window into the lives of people with dementia.
 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

Contact the team!

If you wish to contact the team please email the admin

SONAR

Team Sonar – Affinity

About Affinity

The Create4Dementia hack event hosted 50+ hackers with skills in software, design and healthcare to develop innovative technologies for those living with dementia in 24 hours. The team from Open Lab – Team Sonar – consisted of Andy Garbett, Ed Jenkins, Dan Richardson, Tom Nappey and Reuben Kirkham were awarded with the ‘Most Provocative Concept’ by the judges for their prototype location tracking and ambient display.
The day began with orientation presentations from leading experts in the field of health research around dementia, local care providers and technologists. During these presentations it became apparent we as care providers and developers of technology are quick to use technology on, rather than with, those living with dementia without considering the impacts this may have. Therefore the Affinity concept aims to turn the tables and enforce that carers use an app that records their location and makes that available to the person living with dementia through an ambient display.
The Affinity prototype consists of an ambient display that can be used as a clock face as well as a display that shows the person living with dementia an abstracted overview of where family members are and how close they might be to their current location. They can then send a notification to the carer’s smartphone who will then be prompted to contact their loved one. The second part of the system is the quantification of care in which care providers are being tracked and statistics are used to critically encourage competition between care providers and empower the person living with dementia.
The concept of tracking the those who track others raised questions around the negative implications of what might happen in the future and opened the debate into how we should proceed in the area of tracking those living with dementia.

 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

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The team’s pitch presentation slides

Contact the team!

If you wish to contact the team please email the admin

Gift

Team G.I.F.T. – GiFT

About GiFT

Many people living with dementia avail of day care services provided by charities and local authorities. These services provide support, friendship and stimulation for people with dementia through group-based activities. However, family caregivers are often unaware of the activities that take place at day care, which presents challenges for the care giving relationship. For example, the interests and behavior of people with dementia may change significantly over time. Moreover, service providers lack a simple means of communicating and explaining to family caregivers the details of day-to-day activities. Our project, GiFT, is intended to bridge the gap between professional caregiving and family caregiving, improving the experience for people with dementia, caregivers and service providers.

The GiFT system has three components: 1) a mobile phone application for use by care workers, 2) a server side system for storing and streaming audio, and 3) an internet connected radio transmitter. A simple one-touch interface allows the care worker to audio record the interactions that they already have with people during activities in day care. Crucially, the system asks no extra work of care workers beyond starting and stopping the record function. Audio is automatically uploaded from the app to a server where it can be accessed by an internet-connected, highly localized radio transmitter. This system allows care givers and people with dementia to collaboratively listen back to those interactions on their home radio, requiring no new equipment or technical knowledge beyond an internet connection for the transmitter.

GiFT supports the relationship of care through providing a shared activity, and through provoking insight – caregivers are supported in becoming more aware of the current abilities, interests and activities of their family member, whose behavior may be in transition.
 
c4d-radio-gift
 

Coming up with the idea – a mid-process update with the team

The team’s pitch

The team’s pitch presentation slides

Contact the team!

If you wish to contact the team please email the admin